Diggers work to restore access to Manawatū beach — not ours though

Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but this time:

  • it’s not Waikawa Beach
  • the Council are taking swift action
  • the Council have a long-term plan.
  • it’s Manawatū District Council

Diggers are working to restore vehicle access to a popular Manawatū beach after a stream cut into its entrance. 

Work on the damaged Himatangi beachfront is expected to finish this week, following destructive weather on August 18 that caused the river’s flow to deviate and eat into the beach’s entrance and sand dunes.

Manawatū District Council community facilities manager Mathew Bayliss​ said it was the first step in a four-year programme to repair broken sand dunes and improve access to the beach.…

The river path had turned sharply toward the sand dunes, consuming the thoroughfare used by vehicles. …

The council has lodged consents with Horizons Regional Council to extend the river’s retaining walls from the village’s surf lifesaving club to the beach. 

That work would strengthen the riverbank and provide a long-term solution, Bayliss said. 

“If we are able to take the retaining wall out into the beach, [the river] won’t turn back as much.”

But that work was at least two years away and, in the meantime, diggers were using driftwood to steady the riverbank and redirect water flow.

Other work to future-proof the beach is also in the pipeline. This includes rebuilding several dropouts along the sand dunes, which have created problems for nearby homes exposed to sandstorms during strong westerly winds.

The council has planted grasses to steady the dunes, however, significant work is required to solidify other vacant gaps.

Source: Diggers work to restore access to Himatangi Beach | Stuff.co.nz.

To be fair, Himatangi Beach is a bigger community than ours. Otherwise, the similarities and different responses are astounding …

3 thoughts on “Diggers work to restore access to Manawatū beach — not ours though”

  1. Interesting that they are actively using driftwood to steady the riverbank and redirect water flow.
    Perhaps we could also look at this as an option while we wait for official action ?
    The heavy logs washed up at the south end of the lagoon have built up sand there and stabilised this part of the beach.
    Suggests it may also be possible to also stabilise the beach access?

    1. The current beach access is unlikely to ever be stabilised until the wandering rivermouth is permanently tamed.
      Rocks, depth to below, and extrusion to below the mean high-time. With the strength of the predominent norwester winds and currents, nothing else will suffice.

  2. Can we plse forward the contact details of these people doing constructive things at this council to BOTH our councils while they bicker over who is responsible for coastal erosion for our neck of the woods.
    May help them cut to the chase…

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