Council have temporarily blocked vehicle access to the beach

The Horowhenua District Council advised they would temporarily block off the beach entrance at the end of Manga Pirau Street with concrete blocks. See Horowhenua District Council clarifies vehicle access to beach 19-Oct-21 for details on why.

Here are photos.

The blocks arrive. Photo supplied by Lesley-Anne Walker.
The blocks arrive. Photo supplied by Lesley-Anne Walker.
Putting blocks in place. Photo supplied by Lesley-Anne Walker.
Putting blocks in place. Photo supplied by Lesley-Anne Walker.

Continue reading “Council have temporarily blocked vehicle access to the beach”

34 He aha tērā? What is that?

Lift a lid on a damp, shady item near your house and you may find one of these. It’s about as long and thick as your finger, greyish with speckles in a kind of striped pattern along its body. He aha tērā? What is that?

A long thick speckled creature oozing along a piece of wood, with hand beside for size.
Photo by Miraz Jordan. Used with permission.

Scroll down to see the answer.

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Horowhenua District Council clarifies vehicle access to beach 19-Oct-21

Since vehicle access to the beach was disrupted on 14 September 2021 there has been a lot of discussion going on between the WBRA, Horowhenua District Council, Horizons Regional Council and the landowners (the Miratanas).

All parties are striving to achieve good access in the long-term for vehicles and horses to the beach.

Today we received an email from Ann Clark, Horowhenua District Council Parks and Property Lead (South) | Kaiārahi ki te Tonga, Papa Rēhia, Rawa, Waea Mahi | (06) 366 0999. She asked us to share the following widely with the community.

For queries about this please contact Horowhenua District Council as they are the ones who have the ear of the landowners and Horizons Regional Council.

As discussed, yesterday Council arranged for the installation of large concrete blocks at the end of Manga Pirau Street and will be erecting the attached signage as soon as they are printed. This is following a request from the owners of the land who have expressed deep concern that damage has been caused to the land and dunes by the creation of new tracks that have not been sanctioned by Council or indeed the owners themselves. The tracks that have been forced through the dunes will have a negative longer term impact on the stability of the foreshore. It is entirely inappropriate for members of the community to take matters into their own hands and plough tracks through what is private land.

On that basis we would appreciate it if you could disseminate this information through your channels to the wider community, specifically in reference to the land being secured against illegal access. Should further breaches occur Council will consider legal options with input from the landowner concerned against those transgressing the private property rights of the owners.

You asked for a plan of the access which has currently been undercut. The area highlighted in blue is the extent of the private land, the green line is the only access to the beach in this location that has been agreed with the owners. This access is currently unusable given the southward trajectory of the stream. Those tracks outlined in red are entirely illegal, the creation of which may be subject to further legal action.

Given the regular movement of the stream southward, and the inability of some individuals to respect current arrangements, it might be appropriate to consider access to the beach from Council land rather than private. P&P would be happy to discuss options.

Beach access - ownership. Illegal track marked in red.
Beach access – ownership. Illegal track marked in red.
Beach access sign 19 October 2021.
Horowhenua District Council Beach access sign 19 October 2021. To be installed once printed.
Screenshot of the email from Horowhenua District Council.
Screenshot of the email from Horowhenua District Council.

Bird of the Year 2021

By my reckoning we see at Waikawa Beach at least 17 of the Bird of the Year 2021 entrants. Some of them have popped up so far in the Quiz.

Bird of the year 2021 web page.

Learn a bit more about the birds (and one bat) and cast a vote:

Aotearoa New Zealand has the most amazing native wildlife! But right now, 80% of our birds (and 100% of our bats) are in trouble. Climate change and habitat destruction are big threats to all our native species. If we protect and restore our rivers, forests, oceans, and climate, we can bring back our native wildlife!

Show your love for incredible native species by casting your vote in Te Manu Rongonui o te Tau/Bird of the Year!

Voting is open from 18-31 October 2021.

Who will you vote for? The choice is so hard!

33 He aha tērā? What is that?

Adults of this almost sparrow-sized but lighter bird have a bright red, white and black face. It’s a pale coloured bird with a distinctive bright yellow stripe on its black wing. They’re often seen in flocks. If you hear a shrill, clear pee-yu, that’s this bird. He aha tērā? What is that?

A pale coloured bird with a distinctive bright yellow stripe on its wing.
Photo by Miraz Jordan. Used with permission. A juvenile, stunned after flying into a window.

Scroll down to see the answer.

Continue reading “33 He aha tērā? What is that?”

HDC draft climate action plan 2021

The Horowhenua District Council has created a draft action plan to cope with climate change. It’s a very readable 24 page document outlining what climate change may mean for the Horowhenua region and what steps the Council is considering to deal with it.

The original document is available from Draft Horowhenua Climate Change Action Plan (separate version, as included in Council Agenda)(PDF, 3MB).

Waikawa Beach is specifically mentioned in at least 1 place, as the screenshot below shows.

#alttext#
Screenshot from the plan.

Impacted coastlines and coastal communities

Our coastlines and coastal communities will likely be significantly affected by:

  • Coastal erosion and accretion
  • Changing river mouths and estuaries
  • Rising sea levels
  • Warmer water temperatures
  • Flooding and inundation
  • Storm events and surges

Coastal settlements and areas such as Waikawa Beach may experience river mouth migration if the sea level rises. This may mean that any restrictions to flow (sea walls/ structures) may cause overflow and flooding. This will affect property and infrastructure and may mean some family or communities will need to migrate to other areas.

Some other interesting items include:

  • ensure new builds are more self-sufficient with storm water management, for instance rain water tanks which minimise demand on local water supplies. (Page 4)
  • creating spaces and shared pathways
    that promote greener modes of transport like walking, public transport and cycling.
    (Page 5)
  • Choose low-methane sheep breeds. (Page 11) [can’t see the sheep for the cows …]
  • Page 16: managing coastal hazards
  • Page 17: managing flooding from rivers and streams
  • Invest in more shared pathways (Page 18)
  • Create more green spaces and provide green corridors for active transport. (Page 20)

And also, improving access to and use of public transport options.

This is a very readable, and important document. I suggest you take a look at it.

2021 draft Horowhenua climate change action plan with highlights. (3.3 MB PDF) (Note: this version has a few highlighted portions.)