Waikawa Beach groyne to be partly removed

Horizons Regional Council has agreed to pay for $20,000 in modifications to a dysfunctional seawall at Waikawa Beach. …

Horizons’ river management group manager Ramon Strong said a consultant’s report recommended part of the groyne – a type of seawall that prevents erosion – should be removed as it was potentially reducing its effectiveness.

Strong said the work was “one step in the journey along the way” for sorting out a long-term solution for Waikawa Beach’s erosion troubles.

Source: Erosion works at Waikawa Beach to be funded by Horizons Regional Council | Stuff.co.nz.

When Ramon Strong presented the Tonkin and Taylor report to the WBRA Committee he pointed out that the high-angle groyne seemed to be causing problems rather than solving them. He said he hoped to be able to remove it, and fairly soon. It looks like that will now happen. He also mentioned using the rocks from that groyne to help build-up the older, longer groyne.

Figure 4, showing the throat of the Waikawa Stream.
Figure 4, showing the throat of the Waikawa Stream.

River mouth photo 24 April 2019

We’ve asked a local drone operator to frequently take photos of the river mouth for our archives. Such photos could be very useful in future if we’re trying to make a case to a Council, for example. Here’s the first photo, acquired 24 April 2019.

River mouth photo 24 April 2019.
River mouth photo 24 April 2019.

By doing a measurement on Google maps, the river seems to travel about 370 metres south from the tip of the groyne, as seen in this photo, before turning seaward.

If you have use for a very high resolution version (24MB) then contact us.

We’re hoping to get several such photos each year, and will post them here for all to see.

Fresh views of the river and (near) shore

We came across some very interesting photos and were given permission to publish them. These mainly aerial views of the river mouth area and a fishing vessel working very close to shore are ones most of us wouldn’t see.

Many thanks to ‘A friend of Waikawa’ for permission to post the drone photos.

Continue reading “Fresh views of the river and (near) shore”

Tonkin and Taylor beach erosion report; public meeting

At the WBRA Committee meeting on Saturday, 13 April 2019 Ramon Strong from the Horizons Regional Council presented the findings from the Tonkin and Taylor report on the river mouth and inlet.

Summary: it’s a complex situation. Ramon Strong aims to hold a public meeting, probably in the first week of June 2019. Watch for further details.

Continue reading “Tonkin and Taylor beach erosion report; public meeting”

Waikawa Beach erosion protection or a buffer zone as in Paekakariki?

This is interesting, especially since it’s just down the coast from us and we’re suffering some similar issues: The Greater Wellington Regional Council is proposing putting in a 40m erosion buffer zone at the southern end of Queen Elizabeth Park.

The council is proposing putting in a 40m erosion buffer zone at the southern end of Queen Elizabeth Park in Paekakariki which would mean relocating buildings, including the surf club, to a safer area.

A 2010 report indicated that Queen Elizabeth Park could lose up to 40m of land due to coastal erosion from climate change or severe weather events at the park.

Over the last few years, there have been a number of significant weather events that have undermined the dunes at the park, and washed away tracks and a bridge.

Greater Wellington Regional Council’s manager of parks Amanda Cox said the council concluded it needed to put in a plan of retreat from the coast.

“We want to pull back with park infrastructure such as roads, tracks, we’ve got the toilet block there, other facilities and relocate those in a safer zone.”

Ms Cox said the council would also be planting out the 40m buffer zone with dunes, so there was a more resilient fore-dune system which would withstand the effects from adverse weather and would allow natural marine processes to take place.

The plan focuses on the coastal edge from the park’s southern entrance at Wellington Road in Paekakariki, to approximately 900m north. …

Judy Lawrence from Victoria University’s Climate Change Research Institute researches climate change science in public policy and decision making. … “It is really interesting because it provides a number of new benefits for the community in creating new spaces, new trails, new beach access, open spaces and so forth,” she said.

It’s worth reading the whole item which gives more detail and mentions certain legal requirements.

When you look at how much land has been lost around the access at the end of Manga Pirau Street in the last decade and what it might cost to deal with that erosion in the face of rising sea levels it seems only prudent to ask about a similar ‘buffer zone’ approach for Waikawa Beach.

Bank retention near the vehicle entrance 05 February 2018.
Bank retention near the vehicle entrance 05 February 2018.
The bank was gone by 25 June 2018.
The bank was gone by 25 June 2018.

The river water by the footbridge WILL get cleaner

At long last we can announce a Landcare Research project whose outcomes include actually making the water in our river cleaner. Our emphasis below.

Where the 2 streams meet, west of Whakahoro Road, dirty water from the Waiouti on the left and cleaner water from the Waikawa on the right.
Where the 2 streams meet, west of Whakahoro Road, dirty water from the Waiouti on the left and cleaner water from the Waikawa on the right.

Waikawa Stream gets grant to clean up waterway

Associate environment minister Eugenie Sage announced a Government grant to contribute to the Waikawa Stream community catchment project.

The Government has announced a $170,000 funding grant to improve the health of a Horowhenua waterway.

Continue reading “The river water by the footbridge WILL get cleaner”